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Posts for: July, 2011

By Beville Dental Care
July 24, 2011
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: fillings  

Cavities used to be nothing to smile about, but thanks to advances in technology, tooth-colored fillings have made repair of decayed teeth so natural, they're invisible. Now you no longer need to feel self-conscious about that unsightly flash of silver when you talk or laugh. While silver amalgam fillings were once the preferred option for tooth restoration filling materials, tooth-colored “composite resins” have gained popularity as a safe and effective alternative to treat new cavities or to replace old silver fillings.

A Better Alternative: Consumer demand for tooth-colored (metal free) restorations as well as the dental profession's desire to preserve as much natural tooth structure as possible has led to the development of special “adhesive” tooth-colored materials. Besides the aesthetic advantages over amalgam fillings, tooth-colored fillings require the removal of less tooth structure. While traditional silver fillings often crack or leak over time, composite resin fillings bond directly to tooth structure and actually reinforce and strengthen it while creating a natural looking smile.

The Choice is Yours: You can choose to replace unsightly silver fillings with tooth-colored ones to enhance their cosmetic appearance. Although concern has been expressed over the mercury content in older silver fillings, years of research cited by the American Dental Association has found that traditional amalgam fillings are safe. Unless you have cracks or damage to your current amalgam fillings or have other concerns regarding your dental health, replacing silver fillings is a matter of personal preference.

Cost: Although composite resin fillings may cost slightly more than silver fillings, they are very durable and may be more cost-effective in the long run.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss any questions you may have regarding tooth colored fillings. Read more about this topic in the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Natural Beauty of Tooth Colored Fillings.”


When it comes to cosmetic dentistry, we have numerous techniques that we can use to produce a dazzling smile while restoring or helping you maintain optimal oral health. From tooth whitening and gum contouring to bonding and veneers, see how much you really know about cosmetic dentistry by playing our matching game.

Words to match:
  1. Whitening
  2. Bonding
  3. Enamel shaping
  4. Orthodontics
  5. Veneers
  6. Crowns and bridgework
  7. Implants
  8. Gum contouring
  1. ______ is a minor surgical procedure in which we alter the position of the gum tissue and sometimes even the underlying bone.
  2. ______ is a treatment option that is not permanent and may require several applications to achieve the desired color results.
  3. ______ is a restorative technique that involves applying an a tooth colored filling material (composite resin) to a tooth that is color-matched and shaped to restore a decayed or damaged tooth.
  4. ______ is a treatment option for restoring heavily damaged teeth or replacing missing teeth.
  5. ______ is a procedure in which small amounts of enamel, a tooth's outer layer, is removed to reshape it to improve the look of a tooth.
  6. ______ is a minor cosmetic procedure in which we apply a peroxide-based material to bleach out minor stains and discoloration from teeth.
  7. ______ is a procedure in which we permanently replace a missing tooth by attaching a crown (artificial tooth) to a titanium post that has been surgically placed within the jaw.
  8. ______ is a treatment option in which teeth are aligned into a proper position giving a more attractive appearance. It is often used in conjunction with other cosmetic procedures.
  9. ______ is a cosmetic technique where we place a custom-designed, thin shell of tooth-colored material (usually porcelain) to the front surface of a tooth.
  10. ______ is the most common technique for repairing chipped, broken or decayed teeth. It may also be used to alter the shape of a small or irregular tooth.

Answers: 1) H. 2) A. 3) B. 4) F. 5) C. 6) A. 7) G. 8) D. 9) E. 10) B

To learn more about cosmetic and restorative dentistry, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Beautiful Smiles by Design.” Or you can contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your specific questions.


By Beville Dental Care
July 10, 2011
Category: Oral Health

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), community water fluoridation has been a safe and healthy way to prevent tooth decay effectively for over 65 years now. In fact, the CDC has recognized water fluoridation as one of the 10 great public health achievements of the 20th century.

It all began back in the 1930's when it was discovered that fluoride had oral health benefits. However, community water fluoridation did not begin until January 25, 1945, when Grand Rapids, Michigan became the first city to add fluoride to its municipal water system. Before it was officially rolled out in other cities, Grand Rapids was compared to other cities or “controlled groups” that had not added fluoride to their water so that scientific research could assess the relationship between tooth decay and fluoride. Well, you can guess the results — it was proven that fluoride helped reduce tooth decay when added to ordinary tap water. On November 29, 1951, the National Academy of Sciences’ National Research Council (NRC) declared water fluoridation safe, effective, and beneficial based upon the results of their findings and the fact that there was a dramatic decline in tooth decay in the children of Grand Rapids.

Ever since, fluoride has continued to play a critical role as a simple, safe, effective way to provide improved oral health by helping reduce tooth decay in the United States. This reality is still being demonstrated with each new generation benefiting from better oral health than the previous generation.

As for identifying when the time is right to introduce fluoride to your children's oral health program, ask us. Most children get the right amount of fluoride to help prevent cavities if they drink water that contains fluoride. And if by chance you live in an area where your tap water is not fluoridated, brush your children's teeth with no more than a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste twice a day and ask your dentist about fluoride supplements and treatment.

Learn more on this topic by reading the Dear Doctor article, “Fluoride And Fluoridation In Dentistry.”


By Beville Dental Care
July 03, 2011
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: oral health   root canal  

Nearly everyone has either said or heard the expression, “I'd rather have a root canal...” when comparing worst-case scenarios. However, this comparison is a common myth for a treatment that is typically successful with little to no pain. In fact, the pain associated with a root canal problem occurs prior to treatment and is relieved by it, not visa versa.

To begin with, let's define what root canal treatment is as well as the field of dentistry that specializes in it. Endodontics (“endo” – inside; “dont” – tooth) is the branch of dentistry that addresses problems affecting a tooth's root or nerve. It is dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and disorders of the root canals of the teeth. The canals inside the tooth roots contain the living tissues called the dental pulp, which also contain the nerves of the teeth. When the pulp inside a problematic tooth becomes inflamed or infected it responds by becoming painful, and pain is a warning sign of a problem. The nature of the symptoms can define the character of the pain and the problem. They include the following:

  • Sharp, acute pain that is difficult to pinpoint
  • Intense pain that occurs when biting down on the tooth or food
  • Lingering pain after eating either hot or cold foods
  • Dull ache and pressure
  • Tenderness accompanied by swelling in the nearby gums

Each of these different categories of pain signify a different problem, but all are related to root canal issues. Nevertheless, you should contact us today (before your condition worsens) to schedule an appointment. And to learn more about the signs, symptoms, and treatments for a root canal, read the article “I'd Rather Have A Root Canal....”