My Blog

Posts for: October, 2012

By Beville Dental Care
October 22, 2012
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: laser dentistry  
LasersAnImportantDentalDiagnosisTool

While lasers have been effective (and safe) tools for healthcare professionals in the medical field for years, did you know that they are fast becoming a vital tool in the field of dentistry for diagnosing dental disease? Lasers, named from “Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation,” are beams of light that are of a single color and wavelength. They also have the unique ability to help dental professionals detect disease in much earlier stages than they have ever before.

Diagnostic lasers are very effective in diagnosing pit and fissure decay — the tiny grooves of the biting surfaces that cannot be seen by visual inspection or reached by a traditional dental tool. They are able to accomplish this by producing a glowing effect known as fluorescence, which is produced by the optical properties of early tooth decay. This enables us to treat tooth decay in its earliest stages as well as monitor teeth from visit to visit.

Another area where lasers have proven valuable is in the detection and localization of dental calculus (tartar) beneath the gums. Calculus is hardened or calcified bacterial plaque that attaches to the teeth. Using lasers, we can find and remove this calculus during periodontal (gum) therapy. Lasers are also helpful in detecting dysplastic (“dys” – altered; “plasia” – growth) or precancerous tissue as well as cancerous tissues. And should we find any of these conditions, lasers are extremely useful in removing tissue close to the margins or edges of where diseased tissue meets healthy tissue. But best of all, lasers are minimally invasive and can result in less tissue removal, less bleeding, and less discomfort for patients after surgery.

To learn more about lasers and how they are used in dentistry, read the article “Lasers Shine A Light On Dentistry.” Or if you want to schedule an appointment, contact us today.


By Beville Dental Care
October 19, 2012
Category: Oral Health
Tags: sleep apnea   snoring   sleep  
TakeOurTestDoesSnoringInterferewithYourSleep

A good night's sleep...have you been getting them lately? While everyone knows that sleep is important, did you know that we all spend about one-third of our lives asleep? And did you know that when deprived of sleep, the negative impact is detrimental on both an individual as well as at the societal level? These important facts are just some of the reasons why there has been an increased interest in studying sleep, sleep loss and sleep disorders.

If you have issues with sleep, you might have a sleep disorder — an epidemic problem that impacts approximately 50 to 70 million people in the US alone. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (“a” – without; “pnea” – breath) (OSA) is a medical condition that occurs when your tongue collapses against the back of your throat causing a significant reduction in your intake of air or even total temporary blockage. If left untreated, OSA can lead to an irregular heartbeat, heart attacks, high blood pressure, and other forms of heart disease plus strokes and even impotence.

Please note that while your responses to the questions below do not equate to a diagnosis, sharing them with our office can be extremely beneficial in helping us properly evaluate and treat issues related to poor sleeping habits.

  • Do you weigh 15 pounds or more than the normal weight range for your height, sex and age?
  • If you are male, is your neck measurement 17 inches or more? Or if you are female, is it 16 inches or more?
  • Do sleep partners routinely tell you that you are a loud snorer and/or that during your sleep you choke, gasp for air or briefly stop breathing?
  • Do you often wake up still feeling tired after 8 or more hours of sleep?
  • Do you often find yourself falling asleep at work or home during periods when you should be awake?
  • Do you suffer from irritability, depression, loss of memory, poor judgment and/or concentration?

The first and most important step in treating sleep apnea is to obtain a proper diagnosis. Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about sleep apnea. We can assist in the diagnosis and treatment of sleeping disorder along with a physician trained in this area. And rest assured that we have many treatment options we can use to help you get a great night's sleep. To learn more about sleep apnea, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “If You Snore, You Must Read More!


ChristieBrinkleySharesHerExperienceWithDentalImplants

Fracturing back molars is an experience no one ever wants to have. But when a helicopter crashed during a back country ski trip, supermodel Christie Brinkley soon discovered that she had fractured two molars. Fortunately for Christie, her oral health was restored with two dental implants. As she said during an interview with Dear Doctor magazine, “I am grateful for the dental implant technology that feels and looks so natural.”

While Christie's dental implants replaced back teeth, we routinely use them to replace both back and the more visible front teeth. But best of all, we have demonstrated expertise at making dental implant crowns look real. This is where we meld science and artistry.

What drives the most natural and beautiful result is how the crown (the visible, white portion of a tooth) actually emerges through the gum tissues. We also match the adjacent teeth identically in color, appearance, shape and profile. But we can't take all the credit, as it takes an entire “behind-the-scenes” team to produce dazzling results. Choice of materials, the laboratory technician (the person who actually handcrafts the tooth), the expertise we use in placing a dental implant crown and the total quality of care we provide are the ingredients necessary for success.

Another critical factor required is ensuring there is enough bone volume and gum tissue to support an implant. Both of these must also be in the right position to anchor an implant. However, if you do not have adequate bone volume, you may be a candidate for a minor surgical procedure to increase your bone volume through bone grafting or other regenerative surgical techniques.

To learn more about dental implants, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Matching Teeth & Implants.” Or you can contact us today to schedule an appointment so that we can conduct a thorough examination, listen to your concerns, answer your questions and discuss treatment options. And if you want to read the entire feature article on Christie Brinkley, continue reading “The Secret Behind Christie Brinkley's Supermodel Smile.”


By Beville Dental Care
October 03, 2012
Category: Oral Health
FactsYouShouldKnowAboutToothWear

You may have noticed, as you get older, that the enamel of your teeth is looking worn in certain areas. Sometimes tooth wear takes the form of a minor chipping or fracturing at the incisal (cutting) edges of the teeth, or a loss of tooth material from the area near the gum line. In more severe cases, worn teeth look quite a bit smaller than they used to. Why does this happen?

Some wear with age is natural. But too much wear can interfere with your bite, expose more sensitive inner parts of the tooth to decay, and give you a more aged appearance.

There are things you can control that affect wear:

Your habits: Clenching or grinding habits, also called “bruxism,” is a major cause of tooth wear. The motion of teeth sliding over each other with forces that are beyond what's normal for biting or chewing causes a mechanical removal of tooth enamel. This can happen during sleep or periods of high stress. In either case there are therapies available, such as a thin, professionally made mouthguard that prevents your teeth from coming into contact with each other. Holding foreign objects, such as nails and bobby pins, between your teeth can also cause wear.

Your diet: Tooth enamel can be eroded (dissolved away) by acidic beverages, such as sodas, sports drinks and juices. Frequent snacking on sugary foods encourages the growth of oral bacteria that produce acid as a byproduct — also leaving your teeth vulnerable to tooth decay. Your saliva can buffer the effects of the acid in your mouth in about half an hour; if you consume these types of foods and beverages continually, there won't be enough time for this to work.

We can restore the appearance and function of worn teeth in a variety of ways. Porcelain crowns and veneers, for example, can re-establish the normal thickness and length of teeth while improving their color and giving you a more youthful appearance.

If you have any questions about tooth wear, please contact us today to schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more about tooth wear by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How And Why Teeth Wear.”