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Posts for: March, 2014

SmileTransformationBeginsandEndsWithSmileDesign

Regardless of culture, the smile is a universal gesture of friendship and openness, and an important communication tool in your social and career relationships. But what if you’re not comfortable with your smile because of misaligned, damaged or missing teeth? That could have a dampening effect on your interactions with people and your own self-confidence.

Cosmetic dentistry can change all that — we have an arsenal of treatments that can rejuvenate your smile. We must first, though, develop a design plan, often involving multiple dental disciplines. It will definitely involve you — your desires, expectations and choices.

It begins with a thought-provoking discussion with our office. Generalities — “I want a beautiful smile” — aren’t enough. Effective planning begins with a clear perspective about your teeth: What do you like or dislike about them? If you could change anything, what would it be? These initial discussions help us specify your expectations.

While the initial discussion envisions the future, the next step focuses on the present — the current condition of your teeth, mouth and entire facial structure. This requires a comprehensive examination to identify any health issues like tooth decay, periodontal gum disease or bone loss. We must also take in the “big picture,” like the shape of your face, out-of-balance features (asymmetries), skin complexion, eye shape and color, or the form and posture of your lips.

Considering all these factors, we then develop a treatment plan with specifics on how to achieve the desired transformation. We will offer our prognosis for what we believe is achievable and maintainable for your specific situation. Here we provide various models, perhaps even including computer simulation, to depict your future smile. In the end, we create a workable plan that meets both reality and your expectations.

With the design plan completed, we can then harness all the techniques and materials available to achieve it. These range from less invasive procedures like whitening, tooth reshaping, cosmetic bonding or porcelain veneers, to more involved restorations like crowns, bridgework or dental implants. In some cases, orthodontics may be necessary to correct bad bites or other malformations of your oral structures.

Smile design ensures we’re employing the right techniques for your particular situation. It all serves the end goal — a new smile that can transform your life.

If you would like more information on smile design, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Beautiful Smiles by Design.”


PlanYourSportsNutritionandHydrationtoReduceToothDecayRisk

If you or your family has an active sports lifestyle, you probably already know the importance of food and liquids for energy and hydration. But what you eat and drink (and how often) could unintentionally increase your teeth’s susceptibility to tooth decay. With that in mind, you should plan your nutrition and hydration intake for strenuous exercise to maximize energy and reduce the risk of tooth decay.

On the general health side, carbohydrates are your main source of energy for sports or exercise activity. You should eat a substantial carbohydrate-based meal (such as pasta, cereal or sandwiches) a few hours before a planned event. An hour before, you can snack on something easily digestible (avoiding anything fatty) to prevent hunger and as additional energy fuel.

It’s also important to increase your liquid intake before strenuous activity to avoid dehydration, usually a couple of hours before so that your body has time to eliminate excess fluid. During the activity, you should drink three to six ounces of water or sports drink every ten to twenty minutes to replace fluid lost from perspiration.

While water is your best hydration source, sports drinks can be helpful — they’re designed to replace electrolytes (sodium) lost during strenuous, non-stop activity lasting more than 60 to 90 minutes. They should only be consumed in those situations; your body gains enough from a regular nutritional diet to replace lost nutrients during normal activity.

In relation to your oral health, over-consumption of carbohydrates (like sugar) can increase your risk of tooth decay. The acid in most sports drinks also poses a danger: your teeth’s enamel dissolves (de-mineralizes) in too acidic an environment. For these reasons, you should restrict your intake of these substances — both what you eat and drink and how often you consume them. You should also practice regular oral hygiene by brushing and flossing daily, waiting an hour after eating or drinking to brush giving your saliva time to wash away food particles and neutralize the acid level in your mouth.

Knowing what and when to eat or drink is essential to optimum performance and gain in your physical activities. Along with good oral hygiene, it can also protect your oral health.

If you would like more information on the best sports-related diet for both general and oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Nutrition for Sports.”


FixingAdultTeethIsNoMissionImpossible-JustAskTomCruise

It's no surprise that plenty of teenagers go in for an orthodontic evaluation and come out wearing braces. But sometimes, an observant orthodontist may notice that an adult's smile could use a little bit of improvement, too. Even an adult like — Tom Cruise?

That's exactly what happened to the star of Top Gun, Rain Man and the Mission Impossible franchise. Cruise, then 39, was taking one of his children for orthodontic work when it was pointed out that the leading man's teeth were also out of alignment. So he opted for braces too.

“Yes, Tom Cruise has braces,” said his publicist when the star appeared, sporting his new orthodontic appliances. “To him, it's no big deal.” Cruise chose to get the relatively inconspicuous ceramic type, with only a thin wire visible in front of his teeth. He wore them for about a year and a half, having them temporarily removed when it was time to make a movie.

Ceramic braces are a popular choice among adult orthodontic patients, many of whom find that less noticeable orthodontic appliances fit in better with their personal or professional lifestyle. Clear aligners also provide a virtually invisible option. We can help you decide which appliance would best meet your needs. But the first step is a thorough evaluation of your periodontal health.

Is it Risky Business to get braces as an older adult? Not usually — but if you do show signs of periodontal disease, which is more prevalent in adults than teens, it's important to bring it under control before beginning your orthodontic treatment. There are also a few medical conditions, such as heart-valve disease, severe uncontrolled diabetes, and leukemia, which might preclude treatment.

For most people, however, orthodontics offers a great way to improve your appearance and boost your self-confidence — even if you're not a movie star. It is estimated that three-quarters of adults have some form of orthodontic problem; and studies have shown that orthodontic treatment can enhance an adult's career opportunities and social life.

So, if you're looking for a better smile at any age, don't hesitate to contact us or schedule an appointment to discuss your treatment options. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Orthodontics For The Older Adult.”


By Beville Dental Care
March 04, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: furcation  
BoneLossAroundRootFurcationsPosesTreatmentandCleaningChallenges

Although they may appear inert, teeth are anything but — they grow and change like other bodily tissues until complete maturation. Teeth roots are especially adaptable; teeth with multiple roots develop much like forks in a road as each root takes a different path toward the jawbone.

This fork where they separate is called a furcation. It’s normal for lower molars and premolars to have two furcations, while upper molars traditionally have three. Furcations pose difficulties for teeth cleaning and maintenance. If bone loss has occurred around them, a condition called a furcation invasion has occurred. This loss is most likely due to periodontal (gum) disease, an inflammation arising from bacterial plaque on the teeth that hasn’t been removed through proper oral hygiene.

We identify furcation invasions through x-ray imaging and tactile probing. They’re classified in three stages of development: Class I describes early onset in which marginal bone loss has occurred, exposing a groove that leads to the beginning of the furcation; Class II is moderate bone loss where a space of two or more millimeters has developed horizontally into the furcation; and, Class III, advanced bone loss whereby the bone loss has extended from one side of the tooth to the other, or “through and through furcation.”

Our first step in treatment is to remove any detectable plaque and calculus on the tooth surface, including the roots (known as scaling and root planing). These areas can be difficult to access, especially near furcations, and requires special instruments known as scalers or curettes. We may also employ ultrasonic scalers that use high-frequency vibrations coupled with water to break up and flush out the plaque and calculus.

We then apply antimicrobial or antibiotic medicines to further disinfect the area and inhibit bacterial growth while the affected tissues heal. As the infection and inflammation subsides, we then turn our attention during subsequent visits to address the bone loss around the furcation. This may involve surgical procedures to aid in re-growing gum tissue and bone and to create better access for cleaning and maintaining the area.

Finally, it’s important to establish good oral hygiene habits and regular checkups and cleanings to prevent further complications or a reoccurrence of the disease. Maintaining these habits will help you avoid tooth loss and other problems with your oral health.

If you would like more information on furcations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “What are Furcations?